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The Mystery at the Moss-covered Mansion

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Nancy's father Carson Drew enlists her help in tracking down a missing heiress, and Nancy, Bess and George stumble upon a mysterious moss-covered mansion. The girls learn someone was murdered near the mansion and they hear strange noises coming from inside the building. Action bounds in this thrilling adventure involving gypsies, a missing heiress, a needy elderly lady, a Nancy's father Carson Drew enlists her help in tracking down a missing heiress, and Nancy, Bess and George stumble upon a mysterious moss-covered mansion. The girls learn someone was murdered near the mansion and they hear strange noises coming from inside the building. Action bounds in this thrilling adventure involving gypsies, a missing heiress, a needy elderly lady, a reclusive artist, an airplane accident, and a forest fire


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Nancy's father Carson Drew enlists her help in tracking down a missing heiress, and Nancy, Bess and George stumble upon a mysterious moss-covered mansion. The girls learn someone was murdered near the mansion and they hear strange noises coming from inside the building. Action bounds in this thrilling adventure involving gypsies, a missing heiress, a needy elderly lady, a Nancy's father Carson Drew enlists her help in tracking down a missing heiress, and Nancy, Bess and George stumble upon a mysterious moss-covered mansion. The girls learn someone was murdered near the mansion and they hear strange noises coming from inside the building. Action bounds in this thrilling adventure involving gypsies, a missing heiress, a needy elderly lady, a reclusive artist, an airplane accident, and a forest fire

30 review for The Mystery at the Moss-covered Mansion

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Bryant

    I was excited to recently acquire a 1941 copy of a Nancy Drew mystery, Mystery at the Moss-Covered Mansion. For some time now (especially after reading Girl Sleuth) I’ve been immensely curious about the differences between the original Nancy Drews and the revised editions done starting in the 1960s. Why were they rewritten? What changed? Which would I like better? So I did some sleuthing of my own by reading the two editions of Moss-Covered Mansion back to back. I read the 1941 original first. I I was excited to recently acquire a 1941 copy of a Nancy Drew mystery, Mystery at the Moss-Covered Mansion. For some time now (especially after reading Girl Sleuth) I’ve been immensely curious about the differences between the original Nancy Drews and the revised editions done starting in the 1960s. Why were they rewritten? What changed? Which would I like better? So I did some sleuthing of my own by reading the two editions of Moss-Covered Mansion back to back. I read the 1941 original first. I enjoyed it for the most part (its unconscious details of daily life back then, such as how cars and telephones worked, were helpful for my own story!). It involved an isolated mansion in the woods with shady goings-on, a missing heiress, and a hostile troublemaker. It had twists and turns and red herrings, and I was able to guess a couple of the solutions at the same pace as Nancy Drew, which is always fun. Nancy was clever and delightful. But the mystery plot didn’t seem very tight; Ned Nickerson, Nancy’s boyfriend, made a rather pointless, one-time token appearance; George and Bess, her friends, were paper dolls and completely interchangeable; and the sensibilities toward heritages other than white American were definitely pre-Civil Rights. So I must admit I liked the 1971 revised edition more. The mystery was completely different – it hardly involved any of the same characters, and the only thing the two books really had in common was the mysterious moss-covered mansion inhabited by wild animals, which concealed two totally different things. (It was interesting to note a couple of “nods” to the original in the 1971, such as a fire, an airplane crash landing, and an impersonator.) It wasn’t the mysteries, though, that made up my mind, because both were good; it was more the characters, structure, and writing. The newer Nancy Drew seemed more modest and approachable somehow – she’s the girl detective I grew up loving. She didn’t leave Bess and George so far in the dust; they really helped her, and each was a more defined character – bold, Judo-flipping George (I love George almost as much as Nancy) and timid, girly Bess. Having interesting sidekicks made Nancy herself more interesting because of their contrasting personalities. Ned Nickerson was a partner who served a definite purpose in solving the mystery. The story was shorter and more streamlined, and all the action seemed more to the point. No ethnicities were demeaned. I’m a lover of detailed, educational settings in novels, and this one was set in a real place – Merritt Island, Florida, which contains the Kennedy Space Center. So there’s my honest opinion. In conclusion: The two are very different books and they each have their own charms – they’re time capsules of two different eras, after all! I’m very glad I read both. And I’m just comparing two editions of one mystery – every other pair will have to be considered in its own right. (Whether I’ll be able to do that myself remains to be seen!)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jessaka

    Note: The Publishsers Ruined This Series Written in 1941 and revised a few times over the years, the last time being 1971, I just deleted this new edition from my kindle. I have the 1941 version in my bookcase, but I wanted to see how it would be to listen to the book. First, the audio didn’t work because the narrator was a grown woman. I believe a teenage girl would have been much better. I dismissed that complaint, but the first words to be spoken were about the Kennedy Space Station. Space stat Note: The Publishsers Ruined This Series Written in 1941 and revised a few times over the years, the last time being 1971, I just deleted this new edition from my kindle. I have the 1941 version in my bookcase, but I wanted to see how it would be to listen to the book. First, the audio didn’t work because the narrator was a grown woman. I believe a teenage girl would have been much better. I dismissed that complaint, but the first words to be spoken were about the Kennedy Space Station. Space station? I don’t remember reading any Nancy Drew book about a space station. And wait, the Kennedy Space was named after J.F. Kennedy in 1963. This book was originally written in 1941. I put the book down. The publishers have ruined this series, just as they have the Dana Sisters and Hardy Boys. I put the book down and decided that I would read my own books, not some imitation of Nancy Drew. Perhaps this is what teenagers expect of Nancy Drew these days. After all, the publishing company was losing money because teens were losing interested in Nancy Drew. I would have told them to find a new series. Leave Nancy Drew alone! Next, they will be editing the books and Nancy Drew will have a cell phone and a computer, if she doesn’t already in the newer editions. It is one thing to edit a book to take out a few racist comments. it is another to change the story for modern audiences. I think teenagers who love this series should get the older books and see how the real Nancy Drew solved mysteries. So, when my eyes are up to it, I will read my original Nancy Drew and give a review on it. “The 1959 modernization resulted in strikingly different versions of the books. Some changes were minor, even silly (Nancy's hair color went from blond to titian; her roadster became a convertible. The Hardy Boys play tennis instead of baseball; their roadster became a jalopy). But the overall result is a simplification of the language and condensation of the plots. Out went the big words, along with any semblance of detail and emotional depth.” http://articles.latimes.com/1991-08-1... Out went the big words? Is that because modern teens don’t know big words and don’t wish to learn them? And to think that the librarian I knew in the late 50s complained to me that the books were not well written, the grammar was bad. I didn’t care because the stories were good. Maybe the modern teens don’t care because they want mysteries that they can relate to as well. I just know that until the publishers get it right, I will only read books published before 1959.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kavita

    This one was really hilarious! It starts off typically enough for a Nancy Drew. Nancy's father is on a case and he asks her to help her with decoding some messages. His client is accused of smuggling in bombs inside oranges to the space centre in Florida, and Mr Drew is out to prove him innocent. Father and daughter, along with George, Bess, and Hannah Gruen, go off to Merritt Island to investigate further. I devoured these Nancy Drews as a child and this was the first one that had Ned in it as This one was really hilarious! It starts off typically enough for a Nancy Drew. Nancy's father is on a case and he asks her to help her with decoding some messages. His client is accused of smuggling in bombs inside oranges to the space centre in Florida, and Mr Drew is out to prove him innocent. Father and daughter, along with George, Bess, and Hannah Gruen, go off to Merritt Island to investigate further. I devoured these Nancy Drews as a child and this was the first one that had Ned in it as a real character. In all my previous books, he was just present in the background but never played an active role. So this was a special book in that respect. Of course, I didn't read them in sequence. Once in Merritt Island, Nancy comes across a mansion she wants her father to purchase as a holiday home. Unfortunately, the estate next door is filled with wild animals. This really didn't add to the story and I am still confused why those animals were there. The hilarious bit is that the villain had a room full of boiling water, just waiting for someone to show up. This was so Bollywoodish that I just had to laugh! The Cold War rears its head and the usual annoying 'some Commie is targetting our space station' shit is the basis of the story. Though the book was originally written in 1941, it was revised in the 1970s, and the story completely changed to suit the times. It looks like the original story would have been much more interesting.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Moonkiszt

    Adventures centering on a Moss-Covered Mansion, and mostly the weather is very wet, and rainy. They are constantly sliding around on mud or running through dripping forests at the center of which sits the Moss-Covered Mansion that emits (or seems to) animal-like screams at odd moments. A couple of old men wander through the narrative from time to time. A woman in a red robe is key, but shows up only once. Oh, and there is a painting by a famous artist of ND. Hmm. #18 has some of the same issues t Adventures centering on a Moss-Covered Mansion, and mostly the weather is very wet, and rainy. They are constantly sliding around on mud or running through dripping forests at the center of which sits the Moss-Covered Mansion that emits (or seems to) animal-like screams at odd moments. A couple of old men wander through the narrative from time to time. A woman in a red robe is key, but shows up only once. Oh, and there is a painting by a famous artist of ND. Hmm. #18 has some of the same issues that the last few previous Nancy Drew's have had. . .and it is an ugly wart growing on my enjoyment of the re-read of this series. Whoever the main writer is for these last few books is a different person entirely, it feels like. . . they are racist, sexist and classist. Am I just now noticing? I don't think so, but could be. In this book servants' interactions are portrayed using "eye dialect" (early on we are greeted by a smiling colored maid): "Yes, Miss, he spent some time at de telephone den left de house." "Any message for me?" (Nancy) "He say to tell yo' dat so far nothing done develop from de Karter clue." Hmm. And that was not all. Gypsies were in this book, and imposed on them were stereotypic slurs. This is all stuff I read as a kid, and don't remember a minute of it. . .would swear that it was not there - but clearly it was there, informing my little self. That bugs. The story itself was a romp around a stolen inheritance because the inheritor was missing in the wide world. All had to be restored by the active involvement of Nancy, Bess (who appears to be from a very wealthy family in this book), and George. All noted above irritated me enough to NOT say this was a favorite for me, of this series. I will continue to ponder, and move on to #19.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tamara Vallejos

    Hahaha this was sooooo bad (the worst Nancy Drew book thus far) it was almost good?? I still can't tell. But here are actual lines from the book: "I could use some help solving the mystery of the explosive oranges" and "Police! NASA agents! FBI! Open the secret lock, Longman! Let the animals loose!" Sooooo absurd. This is the 1960s revision so it centers around a plot to blow up a rocket ship to the moon at the NASA base in Florida. I do love when Nancy Drew gets a chance to get out of River Heig Hahaha this was sooooo bad (the worst Nancy Drew book thus far) it was almost good?? I still can't tell. But here are actual lines from the book: "I could use some help solving the mystery of the explosive oranges" and "Police! NASA agents! FBI! Open the secret lock, Longman! Let the animals loose!" Sooooo absurd. This is the 1960s revision so it centers around a plot to blow up a rocket ship to the moon at the NASA base in Florida. I do love when Nancy Drew gets a chance to get out of River Heights, but come onnnnnnn. The bombers first use crates of exploding oranges and then try for a laser. A LASER AND EXPLODING ORANGES TO FIGHT NASA. I can't. This was awful and I think also great. But I'll need to sleep on it to be sure.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    COUNTDOWN: Mid-20th Century North American Crime BOOK 209 (of 250) Need a walk down memory lane, or just a chill-out? You can't go wrong with Nancy or the Hardy Boys. Hook=4 stars: Nancy and her father review an odd personal message in a Florida newspaper. Nancy's friends arrive via a car crash right at her front door, and they all decide to take off to Florida for the Kennedy Space Center, as they've decoded "NASA" from said personal message along with the reader. What's going on at NASA? Nice op COUNTDOWN: Mid-20th Century North American Crime BOOK 209 (of 250) Need a walk down memory lane, or just a chill-out? You can't go wrong with Nancy or the Hardy Boys. Hook=4 stars: Nancy and her father review an odd personal message in a Florida newspaper. Nancy's friends arrive via a car crash right at her front door, and they all decide to take off to Florida for the Kennedy Space Center, as they've decoded "NASA" from said personal message along with the reader. What's going on at NASA? Nice opening, original. Pace=3: Okay. The author strains for a Big Event per chapter, and sometimes has several, but then again that event might be the girls shopping at a nearby market. Plot=2: Wild animals, exploding oranges, an Adams Family-Style creepy mansion (on the Florida coast?) with SOMETHING in the basement and a tower with a telescope are odd elements which don't really mesh. There are some good Nancy Drew plots: I've read them. This is rather weak. People=2: Nancy is memorable in that she appeared in over 50 books. But in this edition, we learn next to nothing about her character, nor of her many best friends. Place=1: If you're gonna write about Florida, you have to talk about the humidity. And if you are in Cocoa Beach, there is the ocean spray and breezes and surfers, etc. And the mansion as described would never be built in Florida. And there wouldn't be a wild animal training park in the suburbs. There is no attempt at anything close to reality here. Lazy in this element. SUMMARY: My average rating is 2.4 or 2 stars here on goodreads. I've read a number of these books in this series which are better. This one is on the odd and weak side in plot and place.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    Obviously a re-write because the plot is all about NASA, which obviously was not in force in 1941. Something about explosive oranges being shipped to Cape Canaveral in order to derail the moon launch. No, really. Hilarious, and reads like a NANO project. Carson Drew is ok with springing for plane tickets for himself, Nancy, and Hannah (and Bess and George?) to fly from River Heights (not sure but think it's Upstate NY) to Melbourne, FL, but totally pissed to shell out a few bucks in cab fare from Obviously a re-write because the plot is all about NASA, which obviously was not in force in 1941. Something about explosive oranges being shipped to Cape Canaveral in order to derail the moon launch. No, really. Hilarious, and reads like a NANO project. Carson Drew is ok with springing for plane tickets for himself, Nancy, and Hannah (and Bess and George?) to fly from River Heights (not sure but think it's Upstate NY) to Melbourne, FL, but totally pissed to shell out a few bucks in cab fare from the airport to the house they're staying in. Also, Ned's family just so happens to have a summer home on the same Floridian island as Mr Drew's client. And poor plump Bess wants to eat every eleven pages, and George rips on her every time she mentions food. Later, after Mr. Drew has to leave unexpectedly and then returns suddenly (no kidnapping in the meantime!), the landing gear on his plane jams, so they just belly land the plane and everyone gets off just fine. No mention of escape slides or anything. And the crooks communicate using codes in personal ads in the local paper. Nancy et al (Bess, George and the three guys) get tear-gassed by random bearded assailants in the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA, but nobody loses consciousness. This one even has a NANO-esque ending, because rather than actually figuring out the mystery, Nancy and Ned sneak into the guy's house and overhear the gang recounting every detail. Very convenient. The only sad unanswered question in the denouement is that we never know if the Drews bought the summer house that's adjacent to the Nickerson's summer house. Wah.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

    The team is in Florida! And we have as many as maybe 3 messy mysteries to solve, most of which involve the girls nearly being eaten and attacked by large animals. This exciting tale also features my favorite aspect about these Nancy Drew books: Stupid villains! They launch implausible and overly complicated schemes with clear-as-mud reward structures. What would anyone gain by smuggling into NASA a truck full of oranges—each orange carefully packed with explosives? Who did he get to carry out thi The team is in Florida! And we have as many as maybe 3 messy mysteries to solve, most of which involve the girls nearly being eaten and attacked by large animals. This exciting tale also features my favorite aspect about these Nancy Drew books: Stupid villains! They launch implausible and overly complicated schemes with clear-as-mud reward structures. What would anyone gain by smuggling into NASA a truck full of oranges—each orange carefully packed with explosives? Who did he get to carry out this plan? All of his assistants and cronies are lazy, and like himself, stupid, excepting that the villain is the special type of stupid that allows him to be a rocket scientist, yet he can be tracked and captured by a trio of young women: young women who are sleep-deprived, hungry (because the household "help" eats all their food and doesn't clean up), and the young women are constantly in danger because, as stated before, they are surrounded by large carnivorous animals that live right next door thanks to a shady real estate deal. Bonus: most disgusting snack I've seen to date. While viewing a shuttle launch, Ned and Nancy visit the snack bar and buy "hamburgers and milk." I cannot think of anything worse to eat during a hot summer day. I honestly think "jellied consommé" would be better.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Heidi Potenza

    I read this as part of a book challenge and it was actually quite enjoyable. I read every Nancy Drew book as a kid and watched the television show faithfully. Reading this story is almost like opening a time capsule with newspapers full of coded messages to communicate, station wagons, teens eating formal lunch and dinner and going to church together all while solving a mystery. Nancy Drew is the consummate girl-detective and perfect in every way. She manages to find trouble wherever she goes an I read this as part of a book challenge and it was actually quite enjoyable. I read every Nancy Drew book as a kid and watched the television show faithfully. Reading this story is almost like opening a time capsule with newspapers full of coded messages to communicate, station wagons, teens eating formal lunch and dinner and going to church together all while solving a mystery. Nancy Drew is the consummate girl-detective and perfect in every way. She manages to find trouble wherever she goes and this book didn't disappoint (wild tigers and boiling water pits anyone?) A classic!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Y

    "I could use some help in solving the mystery of the explosive oranges." How could they possibly have NOT titled this book "The Mystery of the Explosive Oranges"? A particularly stupid mystery in Nancy's lineup.

  11. 4 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    Yet another excellent addition to the Nancy Drew book series.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jentry

    This Nancy book is a delight. I loved this one. :)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Simone S.

    Ok let's just imagine me as Stitch.... and Cobra as Carolyn Keene for a sec.... This book was soooo frustrating to me!!!!!!!!!! For one thing - I have to say first up - If you are an 8 year old, don't listen to me. This book was great! And educational! And there were wild animals - Oooh! *shudder*. Read this Nancy Drew now! Back to the 13+ audience. This was soooo frustrating!!!!! I was just like the whole time: Nancy! Why are you even bothering with this - you know you're always uber-perfectly righ Ok let's just imagine me as Stitch.... and Cobra as Carolyn Keene for a sec.... This book was soooo frustrating to me!!!!!!!!!! For one thing - I have to say first up - If you are an 8 year old, don't listen to me. This book was great! And educational! And there were wild animals - Oooh! *shudder*. Read this Nancy Drew now! Back to the 13+ audience. This was soooo frustrating!!!!! I was just like the whole time: Nancy! Why are you even bothering with this - you know you're always uber-perfectly right. JUST CALL THE COPS AND ARREST THEM!!!!! But then I guess that's not very fair.... because of the whole 4th wall thing. She doesn't know she's 'Nancy Drew Girl Detective!' she's just her. With her daddy's money. I think the author (Carolyn or one of the other Nancy Drew writers, not sure...) was trying to make this educational - or maybe the first edition of ND was centered around a time when NASA was all the rage. But for certain we spent a lot of time, sashaying through a NASA museum thing, and learning about spaceships! Uuuuuuuuuuuuuuggggghh....ggggggggh So I admit. I sped-read. That's right. I just scanned those pages like a toddler until I saw the plot picking back up. Somehow it feels dishonest... But cut me some slack. Nancy-Drew-dialogue about how our brave American-space-cadets-blah-blah-blah-blah. I can't even remember what was important or not in that story... and it took me forever to read! It was like - how I'm sure most of you know -: The last 5 minutes of a workout - and you just want to st-ooop *sob*, but fiiiive moooore min-utes.... and then I can face myself later and say I actually committed to this! And then it's over and you're just so glad you don't have to do this again until tomorrow? The last 5 chapters were like that. And naturally we got Ned to be all macho and 'I'll go first Nancy. There may be someone down there....' and '....I'll go with you Nancy. You'll be safer with a man around.' and 'With Ned's help she hoisted herself up on the __some secret object___ to do some trivial cutesy task - like eavesdrop, or whisper to someone tied up in a prison or something.' Or the 'Ned chase that man running away over there and get into a fist fight with him - which you will win - unless it's dark, or there are two of them!' or 'Ned! Kick down this door and save me from the scary bad men who tied me up down here - because you just have PERFECT TIMING! And you remembered like a respectful young man to call my father. :) ' So at the end of the day.... Mr. Drew saved us by calling the CIA (or FBI..?) and NASA to arrest the bad guys. Ned made being held prisoner a bit easier. Bess and George... did nothing really... but they had their helpful moments. Hannah Gruen got to be in this book more than usual. She came along on a trip to the mystery-zone area to provide emotional support. :) So a summary of this Nancy Drew... There were some explosive oranges (I KNOW RIGHT!!!?) that some bad guys were going to use to blow up a space shuttle at take-off day, because... terrorism? And Nancy uses her amazing code deciphering skills to figure out who the bad guys might be. Also the bad guys **BABY SPOILER!** have a room... with a pool of boiling water... to throw their captives into. I found that a very violent touch. Very. But cuz this is a kids' book we only forced _____ to stand on the narrow ledge, and wait for _____ to get tired and fall in by __self. So if you're 6-11 yrs old. And you like Nancy Drews. Do go ahead and read this one! If you are only reading these, because you missed out on the whole haul of Nancy Drews during that phase that nearly all girls have. Save. Yourself. The trouble. Some Nancy Drews are tolerable, but this one was pushing my patience-o-meter. -- Also as a side note - You can probably see I just figured out how to get GIFs into reviews. Thanks to Brenna from this random forum post I stumbled on. :) https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/... ....... And now. I will put waaaaay too many gifs in my reviews. You're Welcome. Thanks for reading! ~Simone

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Oh God. Just when you thought things couldn't get crazier, Nancy's in a fucking plane crash. So: Bess originally stumbles onto the moss-covered mansion in question while the girls take a detour off the main road somewhere, and hears a scream, and runs away. Nancy and George are intrigued, but George falls into an old fish pond and then loses her watch. A red-bearded man comes out of the house and orders them to GTFO. Nancy doesn't want to, but he has a damn gun. The girls are on their way to a tow Oh God. Just when you thought things couldn't get crazier, Nancy's in a fucking plane crash. So: Bess originally stumbles onto the moss-covered mansion in question while the girls take a detour off the main road somewhere, and hears a scream, and runs away. Nancy and George are intrigued, but George falls into an old fish pond and then loses her watch. A red-bearded man comes out of the house and orders them to GTFO. Nancy doesn't want to, but he has a damn gun. The girls are on their way to a town called Ashley, to meet up with Carson Drew for his birthday. Nancy's present to him is an oil portrait of... Nancy. (Granted, Carson loves the gift... I mean, it seems odd, but he is her dad and he loves her, so I guess it makes sense.) The painting was damaged in transit, but Nancy and the owner of the boarding house where they're staying repair it. And the (black) cook makes a birthday cake for Carson. It's a big ol' party. Carson is trying to track down June Campbell because she inherited a bunch of money from her dead mom. Nancy decides to help. They meet Ms. Labelle, who knew June, and Penelope, one of her old friends, who can help identify June if she's ever found - although Mrs. Labelle's fucking ceiling falls while the girls are visiting and Nancy's ass is knocked out. Also NED COMES TO VISIT YAY, and on the last day of his visit Nancy and Ned go to "look at some gardens," which I like to think actually means "went parking and made out." And he tells her to come home soon and sends her a postcard after he's gone home. The girls make several trips out to the scary house, mostly to find George's missing watch (which they do find). A fisherman warns them off, and they hear that a man was shot, taken to the hospital, and died. A swarthy jackass named Ramo claims it was his brother and that the girls know something and then proceeds to be shady af for the rest of the book. (The girls think he's bad and don't feel sympathy for his dead brother, especially once they find out he most likely didn't even HAVE a brother.) A woman claiming to be June shows up, and Carson isn't sure about her but gives her the $52,000 anyway. (That would be about $846,000 now, so hell yes.) Of course she's a fucking imposter. She's a fortune teller's daughter and Ramo's niece. Nancy and Carson get a lead about June, and decide to take a plane, but fog comes up and THE FUCKING PLANE CRASHES AND CARSON ISN'T BUCKLED IN AND A TREE FALLS ON NANCY WHEN SHE'S TRYING TO HELP THE PILOT. And then she wakes up and SHE'S IN THE MOSS-COVERED MANSION. She's so worried about her dad, though, that she leaves immediately. So: the guy at the mansion is a famous artist. June arrives to pose for some artwork, WITH FUCKING WILD ANIMALS. Adjective, not verb. They catch the thieves and recover the money, and June gives money to poor Mrs. Labelle, who is broke and has heart attacks during the book and is broke. Nancy, along with surviving a FUCKING PLANE CRASH, is thrown out of Ramo's car when she tries to stop him from fleeing, rescues an escaped carnival monkey, and serves as nursemaid to Mrs. Labelle. She's totally the best.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chelsey

    Comparison of ‘The Mystery at the Moss-Covered Mansion’ and ‘Mystery of the Moss-Covered Mansion Here is something you need to know before you bother reading these different text versions of this Nancy Drew book. These are completely different books. The only things in common would be is that there is a mysterious moss-covered mansion with African jungle cats inside. You’ll be on completely different rides for each book. As you may know, the revised text was made for more modern audiences. (in th Comparison of ‘The Mystery at the Moss-Covered Mansion’ and ‘Mystery of the Moss-Covered Mansion Here is something you need to know before you bother reading these different text versions of this Nancy Drew book. These are completely different books. The only things in common would be is that there is a mysterious moss-covered mansion with African jungle cats inside. You’ll be on completely different rides for each book. As you may know, the revised text was made for more modern audiences. (in the 70’s) I could tell that as I read the books. In the original text, there is a 40’s setting, and although Nancy is still adventurous and bold, she is a bit more a ‘proper lady’. When you read the original text, you may find that it is quite slow for the first half, then lots happens in the second half. Another thing people may not like is the countless attempts she has trying to get into the mansion. However, one thing I admire about this book compared to the other one is that the mystery is really centered on the moss-covered mansion and trying to figure it out. Nancy didn’t really get deep into the idea of the mansion as much. More young readers today would prefer the revised text. There is a lot more things happening in it, and Nancy went to more places. There is a more modern personality, and readers will enjoy that. I prefer the mystery in the original text however. But that is just me. Here are the descriptions for the two texts: Original Text: Nancy's father Carson Drew enlists her help in tracking down a missing heiress, and Nancy, Bess and George stumble upon a mysterious moss-covered mansion. They later hear that someone was murdered near the mansion and they hear strange noises coming from inside. Revised Text: a friend of Nancy's father has been arrested and charged with sending a truck loaded with explosive oranges into the Space Center complex at Cape Kennedy. Knowing that he could not possibly be guilty of sabotage, Nancy and her father rush to the defense of the accused innocent man. During the Drews' investigation, Nancy becomes suspicious of an old, spooky mansion. Behind a high mesh enclosure, wild African animals roam about the extensive grounds. Nancy discovers that something besides the training of wild animals is going on at the mysterious moss-covered mansion estate.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emily V

    I loved this book!! I think it is such a good mystery and super exciting!!!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Scilla

    This was probably my least favorite Nancy Drew book so far. The plot felt very forced and unbelievable, which admittedly comes with the territory of a Nancy Drew mystery but this one was especially bad. The story is also not ended in a satisfying way. Nancy and her friends save the day but the criminal mastermind's motive to blow up a NASA rocketis vaguely described as "extreme political ideology" and random characters are introduced at the last second in order to tie everything up. This book de This was probably my least favorite Nancy Drew book so far. The plot felt very forced and unbelievable, which admittedly comes with the territory of a Nancy Drew mystery but this one was especially bad. The story is also not ended in a satisfying way. Nancy and her friends save the day but the criminal mastermind's motive to blow up a NASA rocketis vaguely described as "extreme political ideology" and random characters are introduced at the last second in order to tie everything up. This book definitely shows the age of the Nancy Drew Mysteries

  18. 5 out of 5

    Greta

    Highlights: exploding oranges, exotic menagerie of wild animals next door. (For some reason the menagerie thing reminded of Heart of Darkness/ Isle of Dr. Moreaux.)I kept picturing Brando there, it has minimal appearance in book..some things (or baggage)you just bring to books on your own. P.S. Spanish Moss...I'm there.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Ohhhh, Nancy Drew!!! I loved reading these & Trixie Belden stories when I was younger. I didn't realize then how awesome it was to have a girl detective as the heroine...I am a huge fan of girl power! I think every girl should read these growing up! Ohhhh, Nancy Drew!!! I loved reading these & Trixie Belden stories when I was younger. I didn't realize then how awesome it was to have a girl detective as the heroine...I am a huge fan of girl power! I think every girl should read these growing up!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kyla

    Here's my thing about Nancy Drew. I find a lot of the books fun, but there's something that always drives me nuts. Nancy. Shes perfect at everything and happens to stumble upon essential clues. It gets annoying. However, some of the stories are really interesting

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    Read aloud to my daughter, this was your typical Nancy Drew mystery. Unique events in this story include expoding oranges at NASA, a secret mansion surrounded by wild animals, filled in with lots of your typical Nancy Drew drama, where she is almost attacked by a leopard, and almost falls into a boiling pool. Danger! Danger!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kamara Matthews

    This book is very interesting. Its about how Nancy solves the mystery of the explosive oranges. Lots of bad things happen. From stealing to kidnapping. Thanks to Nancy and her friends they solved the mystery.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    I used to love these books when I was younger but this one just seemed to not flow as well as I remember. I felt the story jumped around and required the reader to make leaps in logic quite often in order to follow the mystery and the connections. That being said, I did still enjoy the story and it did end up all working out so I still give it 3 stars.

  24. 4 out of 5

    John

    My daughter is obsessed with the Nancy Drew books. She's read the first 19 so far. We just ordered a bunch more. This sounded like a really good one - astronauts and wild animals? I'm in. The plot was solid - Mr. Drew gets called to Florida to help a friend who was accused of trying to blow up a moon rocket, so Nancy, George and Bess go down with him to help investigate. There's a lot happening - real estate, wild animals, stolen boats, Nancy's boyfriend, stolen cars, astronauts - and it all get My daughter is obsessed with the Nancy Drew books. She's read the first 19 so far. We just ordered a bunch more. This sounded like a really good one - astronauts and wild animals? I'm in. The plot was solid - Mr. Drew gets called to Florida to help a friend who was accused of trying to blow up a moon rocket, so Nancy, George and Bess go down with him to help investigate. There's a lot happening - real estate, wild animals, stolen boats, Nancy's boyfriend, stolen cars, astronauts - and it all gets wrapped up neatly. I didn't feel like there were a ton of clues along the way that I could have figured out. Still, a fun read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Bryant

    I was excited to recently acquire a 1941 copy of a Nancy Drew mystery, Mystery at the Moss-Covered Mansion. For some time now (especially after reading Girl Sleuth) I’ve been immensely curious about the differences between the original Nancy Drews and the revised editions done starting in the 1960s. Why were they rewritten? What changed? Which would I like better? So I did some sleuthing of my own by reading the two editions of Moss-Covered Mansion back to back. I read the 1941 original first. I I was excited to recently acquire a 1941 copy of a Nancy Drew mystery, Mystery at the Moss-Covered Mansion. For some time now (especially after reading Girl Sleuth) I’ve been immensely curious about the differences between the original Nancy Drews and the revised editions done starting in the 1960s. Why were they rewritten? What changed? Which would I like better? So I did some sleuthing of my own by reading the two editions of Moss-Covered Mansion back to back. I read the 1941 original first. I enjoyed it for the most part (its unconscious details of daily life back then, such as how cars and telephones worked, were helpful for my own story!). It involved an isolated mansion in the woods with shady goings-on, a missing heiress, and a hostile troublemaker. It had twists and turns and red herrings, and I was able to guess a couple of the solutions at the same pace as Nancy Drew, which is always fun. Nancy was clever and delightful. But the mystery plot didn’t seem very tight; Ned Nickerson, Nancy’s boyfriend, made a rather pointless, one-time token appearance; George and Bess, her friends, were paper dolls and completely interchangeable; and the sensibilities toward heritages other than white American were definitely pre-Civil Rights. So I must admit I liked the 1971 revised edition more. The mystery was completely different – it hardly involved any of the same characters, and the only thing the two books really had in common was the mysterious moss-covered mansion inhabited by wild animals, which concealed two totally different things. (It was interesting to note a couple of “nods” to the original in the 1971, such as a fire, an airplane crash landing, and an impersonator.) It wasn’t the mysteries, though, that made up my mind, because both were good; it was more the characters, structure, and writing. The newer Nancy Drew seemed more modest and approachable somehow – she’s the girl detective I grew up loving. She didn’t leave Bess and George so far in the dust; they really helped her, and each was a more defined character – bold, Judo-flipping George (I love George almost as much as Nancy) and timid, girly Bess. Having interesting sidekicks made Nancy herself more interesting because of their contrasting personalities. Ned Nickerson was a partner who served a definite purpose in solving the mystery. The story was shorter and more streamlined, and all the action seemed more to the point. No ethnicities were demeaned. I’m a lover of detailed, educational settings in novels, and this one was set in a real place – Merritt Island, Florida, which contains the Kennedy Space Center. So there’s my honest opinion. In conclusion: The two are very different books and they each have their own charms – they’re time capsules of two different eras, after all! I’m very glad I read both. And I’m just comparing two editions of one mystery – every other pair will have to be considered in its own right. (Whether I’ll be able to do that myself remains to be seen!)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chelsey

    Comparison of ‘The Mystery at the Moss-Covered Mansion’ and ‘Mystery of the Moss-Covered Mansion Here is something you need to know before you bother reading these different text versions of this Nancy Drew book. These are completely different books. The only things in common would be is that there is a mysterious moss-covered mansion with African jungle cats inside. You’ll be on completely different rides for each book. As you may know, the revised text was made for more modern audiences. (in th Comparison of ‘The Mystery at the Moss-Covered Mansion’ and ‘Mystery of the Moss-Covered Mansion Here is something you need to know before you bother reading these different text versions of this Nancy Drew book. These are completely different books. The only things in common would be is that there is a mysterious moss-covered mansion with African jungle cats inside. You’ll be on completely different rides for each book. As you may know, the revised text was made for more modern audiences. (in the 70’s) I could tell that as I read the books. In the original text, there is a 40’s setting, and although Nancy is still adventurous and bold, she is a bit more a ‘proper lady’. When you read the original text, you may find that it is quite slow for the first half, then lots happens in the second half. Another thing people may not like is the countless attempts she has trying to get into the mansion. However, one thing I admire about this book compared to the other one is that the mystery is really centered on the moss-covered mansion and trying to figure it out. Nancy didn’t really get deep into the idea of the mansion as much. More young readers today would prefer the revised text. There is a lot more things happening in it, and Nancy went to more places. There is a more modern personality, and readers will enjoy that. I prefer the mystery in the original text however. But that is just me. Here are the descriptions for the two texts: Original Text: Nancy's father Carson Drew enlists her help in tracking down a missing heiress, and Nancy, Bess and George stumble upon a mysterious moss-covered mansion. They later hear that someone was murdered near the mansion and they hear strange noises coming from inside. Revised Text: a friend of Nancy's father has been arrested and charged with sending a truck loaded with explosive oranges into the Space Center complex at Cape Kennedy. Knowing that he could not possibly be guilty of sabotage, Nancy and her father rush to the defense of the accused innocent man. During the Drews' investigation, Nancy becomes suspicious of an old, spooky mansion. Behind a high mesh enclosure, wild African animals roam about the extensive grounds. Nancy discovers that something besides the training of wild animals is going on at the mysterious moss-covered mansion estate.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Xyra

    Four and a half stars. For all intents and purposes this is an amazing story - well written and plotted. Some of the details in this one are definitely dated; however, the overall theme of homegrown terrorism is not. I'd actually like to get my hands on the original 1941 release to see what has changed (since NASA was not created until after WWII). I'm thinking the 1969 rewrite replaced themes and activities more closely related to WWII. I love that you don't have to read the Nancy Drew mysteries Four and a half stars. For all intents and purposes this is an amazing story - well written and plotted. Some of the details in this one are definitely dated; however, the overall theme of homegrown terrorism is not. I'd actually like to get my hands on the original 1941 release to see what has changed (since NASA was not created until after WWII). I'm thinking the 1969 rewrite replaced themes and activities more closely related to WWII. I love that you don't have to read the Nancy Drew mysteries in order. Each adventure is a complete story unto itself. There might be a tiny reference to a previous adventure, but nothing is heavily based on them so the reader is not confused. This is #18 and before this I read #41. Not an issue at all. In this installment Nancy and her friends travel to Florida and Cape Canaveral to help figure out how exploding oranges got into the NASA compound. While on an unrelated excursion the group happens upon the moss-covered mansion. In the end...nope not giving any spoilers. Nancy, as always, is courageous and thoughtful. She puts her deductive and intuitive powers to work helping free the innocent and imprison the sinister and nefarious. The vocabulary in this book is wonderful! Furtive, nefarious, alight, and many more lovely words sew this story together. Great for young readers...get your dictionaries ready (book or on smartphone/tablet)...build your language base.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

    I've read both versions of this book and the original is way better. It has a murder and wild animals and guns and a house collapses and it is just so good! The revised text is not so great, I mean exploding oranges? An evil lab with a boiling water pool to dispose of your enemies? And whats with Ned's parents happening to have a house near by, that's just weird. And why does it need to mention vacuuming the dining room floor after dinner. . . Who cares? That is just weird detail. Anyways the or I've read both versions of this book and the original is way better. It has a murder and wild animals and guns and a house collapses and it is just so good! The revised text is not so great, I mean exploding oranges? An evil lab with a boiling water pool to dispose of your enemies? And whats with Ned's parents happening to have a house near by, that's just weird. And why does it need to mention vacuuming the dining room floor after dinner. . . Who cares? That is just weird detail. Anyways the original is great and actually was scary. I didn't know what the hell was going on at this creepy house. Nancy hears screams, gunshots, and a dead body shows up the next day. The end was also great, a total surprise.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Madalyn Walker

    This novel is great ! In this book , Nancy and her friends visit Florida to solve a mystery having to do with her father's legal matters . Attacks of wild animals on an estate , exploding oranges at the NASA space station , and crazy men plotting to shoot the rocket that will be carrying 3 astronauts into space are all included . Once again , it is astonishing of how well these books are written . The characters think and act like any normal person would today . This book is part of the Nancy Dr This novel is great ! In this book , Nancy and her friends visit Florida to solve a mystery having to do with her father's legal matters . Attacks of wild animals on an estate , exploding oranges at the NASA space station , and crazy men plotting to shoot the rocket that will be carrying 3 astronauts into space are all included . Once again , it is astonishing of how well these books are written . The characters think and act like any normal person would today . This book is part of the Nancy Drew series and I would recommend reading all 56 of them . This is number 18 in the series , and with 177 pages of suspense and edge written in an old-fashion tone , you would love reading these books .

  30. 4 out of 5

    Josiah

    I liked this book. It had some really interesting action scenes, and I was shocked to find out who was the criminals were at the end! I wish it was more spooky, and most scenes weren’t around the moss-covered mansion.

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